Nearby Nature SoCo Webinar - Wild Words Book Club

May 26, 2020 from 3:00 3:30 PM

Sonoma County Regional Parks invites you to join us for Wild Words Book Club. Cozy up with a good book as we explore the magical world of nature through literature. The book club will meet virtually once a month to come together and discuss the reading.

Half Broke by Ginger Gaffney 
Friday, September 18, 3-4 p.m.

At the start of this remarkable story of recovery, healing, and redemption, Ginger Gaffney answers a call to help retrain the troubled horses at an alternative prison ranch in New Mexico, a facility run entirely by the prisoners. The horses and residents arrive at the ranch broken in one way or many: the horses are defensive and terrified, while the residents, some battling drug and alcohol addictions, are emotionally and physically shattered. With deep insight into how animals and humans communicate through posture, body language, and honesty of spirit, Gaffney walks us through her struggle to train the untrainable.

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A Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Tale of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel 
Friday, October 9, 3-4 p.m.

In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.

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Mountains and Marshes: Exploring the Bay Area’s Natural History by David Rains Wallace
Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m.

Described as “a writer in the tradition of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and other self-educated seers” by the San Francisco Chronicle, David Rains Wallace turns his attention to one of the most distinctive corners of California: the San Francisco Bay Area. Weaving a complex and engaging story of the Bay Area from personal, historical, and environmental threads, Wallace’s exploration of the natural world takes readers on a fascinating tour through the region.  Each essay explores a different place throughout the four corners of the Bay Area, uncovering the flora and fauna that make each so extraordinary.

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